Jul 04, 2022  
2019-2020 University Catalog 
    
2019-2020 University Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses


 

Other Courses

  
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    COOP 460 - Cooperative Education


    3.0 credits
  
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    COOP 469 - Internship


    3 credits
  
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    EDPR 101 - Child Development and Practice for birth - 8


    Associates degree in Early Childhood Education
    Delivery: Lecture
    An introduction to the field of Early Childhood care, this course provides a conceptual framework for understanding the early childhood profession, the role of the early childhood caregiver, and early childhood programs. It examines the historical philosophies and theories of Early Childhood Education as well as the current trends, issues, and practices of educating children from birth through the age of eight. Addresses the influences of family-centered practice, inclusion, culture and language.  Explores early childhood career paths. Professional and evidence-based practices of highly-qualified early childhood educators are outlined with an emphasis on their ability to enhance development and learning of every child between the ages of birth and eight. An overview of the diversity of culture, language, race, socioeconomic status, gender, ethnicity, and ability of children will be included.  

    3 credits
    Fall and Spring
  
  •  

    EDPR 111 - Applied Social and Emotional Development - Birth through 8


    Fulfills a requirement in the A.S. in Early Childhood Education.
    Delivery: Lecture
    Incorporates specific techniques and strategies for guiding and enhancing social and emotional development and learning in children 0-8 years at the introductory level. We will address promotion, prevention, and intervention strategies related to young children’s social-emotional development. The course is built around the Teaching Pyramid (Fox, Dunlap, Hemmeter, Joseph & Strain, 2003), a framework for understanding effective practices related to supporting infant and toddler’s social-emotional development, and understanding and responding to challenging behavior. The model includes a focus on building relationships with children, families, and colleagues; designing environments that support young children’s social-emotional competence; applying strategies for teaching social skills, and promoting emotional development; and developing an effective approach for supporting positive behavior in the context of developmentally appropriate practice.

    3 credits
    Fall and Spring
  
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    EDPR 121 - Applied Cognitive, Physical, and Linguistic Development - Birth to 8


    Fulfills a requirement in the A.S. in Early Childhood Education.
    Delivery: Lecture
    Emphasizes the interrelationship between cognitive, physical, and language development of children age birth to eight at an introductory level. Age appropriate curricular strategies will be discussed and designed based on developmental theories.  The relationship between the young child and environment will be stressed, with important considerations to ecological influences that play a role in children’s development such as families, communities, and culture.  Components of high quality programming will be explored.  Students will also apply critical thinking skills to current issues related to infant and child development.

    3 credits
    Fall and Spring
  
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    EDPR 200 - Supporting Young Children’s Behavior


    Fulfills a requirement in the A.S. in Early Childhood Education.
    Delivery: Lecture
    Involves an exploration of developmentally appropriate, evidence-based approaches and positive guidance strategies for promoting prosocial behaviors in individual and groups of young children ages birth through eight.  The course emphasizes current best practice in providing appropriate environments and designing, implementing, and evaluating individual interventions to promote emotional development, social skills, and appropriate behavior in the context of school as well as home- and center-based early care and education programs. Course content reflects an emphasis on positive guidance principles and techniques, family involvement and cultural influences. Emphasizes supportive interactions and developmentally appropriate environments. Uses assessment to analyze and guide behaviors. This course teaches practical application through direct participation in classroom and care settings.

    3 credits
    Fall and Spring
  
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    EDPR 210 - Highly Individualized Teaching and Learning in Early Childhood


    Fulfills a requirement in the A.S. in Early Childhood Education.
    Delivery: Lecture
    Young children vary widely in their skills, knowledge, backgrounds and abilities. Teaching has to effectively reach all children regardless of their abilities and disabilities. Effective instruction for all children requires specialized teaching and learning opportunities to access, participate, and thrive in the early childhood setting/classroom. Effective teachers are sensitive and skilled in interactions; they use ongoing formative assessment of each child’s skills to plan instruction; and they choose and use curricula and activities that engage all children, regardless of their strengths or needs. This course is an introduction to effective practices that support the development and learning of young children with disabilities and other special needs. This course focuses on evidence-based, individualized instructional methods and strategies used in teaching and facilitating the development of young children. Throughout the course your own classroom or practicum setting and identify a “focus child” about whom you will complete applied assignments.

    3 credits
    Fall and Spring
  
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    EDPR 220 - Engaging Interactions and Environments in Early Childhood


    Fulfills a requirement in the A.S. in Early Childhood Education.
    Delivery: Lecture
    Early childhood is a time of rapid growth and development; children’s early experiences have a profound effect on their later outcomes.  Early childhood education and care has the potential to foster children’s skills and learning, and high quality programs can influence children’s long-term success. The benefit of high quality early educational experiences is even greater for children from economically disadvantaged backgrounds. The key components of a high quality early learning experience include environments that are: (1) well organized and rich with materials that support children’s learning, and (2) provide regular opportunities for children to engage in warm, responsive, and instructionally supportive interactions with caregivers. This course is designed to increase students’ knowledge about the importance of high quality early childhood education, and the specific types of environments and interactions that support the development of children’s social-emotional, cognitive, and early academic skills.

    3 credits
    Fall and Spring
  
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    EDPR 230 - Planning and Assessment in Early Childhood


    Fulfills a requirement in the A.S. in Early Childhood Education.
    Delivery: Lecture
    Ongoing child assessment through systematic observation and documentation is critical to the implementation of effective teaching which can prepare each child for success. Children in early childhood programs have different needs, strengths, experiences, and primary languages. A system of ongoing child observation and assessment will allow the teacher of young children to tailor instruction to the needs of each child, thus facilitating the early development and learning needed for school success. This course provides students with an understanding of the forms, functions, methods, and roles of assessment for planning and implementing effective early childhood programs for young children, ages birth to eight, from diverse cultures and with varied learning needs. Students will explore both quantitative and qualitative approaches to evaluation and assessment. Students will gain an understanding of appropriate strategies for conducting, reporting, and decision making related to specific functions of observation and assessment. They will use selected assessment strategies with young children in their worksites or field placements and are expected to become competent in the use of authentic assessment strategies to describe a child’s learning strengths and instructional needs.

    3 credits
    Fall and Spring
  
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    EDPR 270 - Practicum: Early Childhood


    Fulfills a requirement in the A.S. in Early Childhood Education.
    Delivery: Practicum
    This course is designed to engage early childhood educators in initial teaching experience at the early childhood education level. Students are placed in an early childhood education setting for a minimum of 100 hours of participation. During this field experience, students are required to perform several teaching actions and provide corresponding artifacts. This is a supervised field experience. The instructor observes, mentors and evaluates participants in their settings via an electronic video coaching platform, assesses their performance artifacts, and provides seminars to debrief experiences and explore teaching/learning topics.

    3 credits
    Fall and Spring
  
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    HONR 100 - Foundations of Honors


    This First-Year Experience course introduces students to the meaning and methods of Honors Community Engagement, and the Honors Learning Domains. Students begin to define their role as citizen-scholars through the exploration and interrogation of local communities. Independent research, critical reflection, and experiential learning via the Honors City as Text pedagogy complement the Honors LLC and Core Curriculum and orient students to the praxis of the Honors student-scholar.

    1.00 credits
    Fall
  
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    HONR 101 - Honors:Scientific Investigations


    Fullfils CORE.101 requirement 
    This interdisciplinary course explores important issues of societal and personal relevance by evaluating testable ideas through experimentation
    and literature-based research in lecture and laboratory settings. Students will use the process of science to generate data and
    synthesize new ideas to come to evidence-based conclusions that will illuminate responses to the three core questions: Who am I, What can I know, and given what I know, how should I act? Lecture content will vary across sections to reflect the expertise of instructors from the breadth of scientific disciplines including astronomy,
    biology, chemistry, environmental science, geology, oceanography, physics, public health, and sustainability studies, among others. The laboratory experience complements the lecture by providing students with hands-on opportunities to use the scientific method as they lead their own research investigations.

    4.00 credits
    Spring
  
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    HONR 102 - Honors:Challenges of Democracy


    Fullfils CORE.102 requirement
    This course, which is taught primarily by faculty from the Departments of History & American Studies and Politics & International Relations, investigates the roots of current democratic thought through the study of primary source material dating from antiquity to the present. Other sources of inquiry may include scholarly analyses, films and documentaries, and works of the imagination including literature and art. Upon completion of the course, students will be able to explain, evaluate and critique the key concepts from these primary source readings and demonstrate how these concepts are expressed in the modern world. Special attention will be paid to the student’s ability to apply this knowledge to such topics as political institutions,activism and national identity.

    3.00 credits
    Fall, Spring
  
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    HONR 103 - Honors:Human Behavior Perspective


    Fulfills CORE.103 requirement
    A study of the individual in society, this course draws from disciplines such as psychology, sociology, and anthropology in order to demonstrate the idea that multiple perspectives and frames of reference broaden our understanding of specific behaviors. A focus on cultural diversity will be a central feature throughout the course. The course also proposes a model for critical thinking about human behavior in general. Students explore the limitations of a single point of view and the benefits of information derived from multiple vantages as they consider key existential questions: Who am I? What can I know? And, based upon what I know, how should I act? 

    3.00 credits
    Fall, Spring
  
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    HONR 104 - Honors:Literature and Philosophy of Examined Life


    Fulfills CORE.104 requirement
    This course explores central questions related to the examined life-Who am I? What can I know? How should I act?-through literary and philosophical texts. Participants practice close reading and logical reasoning as methods for understanding how literary and philosophical texts convey meaning. Common readings include selected
    dialogues by Plato.

    3.00 credits
    Fall, Spring
  
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    HONR 105 - Honors:Aesthetics in Context Art Impulse


    The course fulfills the university’s CORE 105 requirement.
    This course examines a variety of masterworks and
    artists from the western traditions of art,
    dance, music, and theater. The course situates
    art in historical perspective, emphasizes
    Classicism, Romanticism, Modernism, and relates
    them to contemporary modes of expression. Works
    of art will be presented in context, so the
    impact of historical circumstance and cultural
    expectation on the creative artist will be
    apparent. Students will respond through oral and
    written analysis to masterworks studied in class
    and to works experienced at outside performances.
    While all sections of the course will include
    historic masterworks from the fields of art,
    theater, dance, and music, specific content of
    individual sections will reflect the interests
    and expertise of the professor. Throughout the
    semester, we will examine a variety of artistic
    works and ideas to explore the role, meaning, and
    implications of questions that have shaped the
    human experience: Who and I? What can I know? How
    should I act?

    3.00 credits
    Fall, Spring
  
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    HONR 105 - Honors:Aesthetics in Context Art Impulse


    Fulfills CORE.105 requirement
    This course examines a variety of masterworks and artists from the western traditions of art, dance, music, and theater. The course situates art in historical perspective, emphasizes Classicism, Romanticism, Modernism, and relates them to contemporary modes of expression. Works of art will be presented in context, so the impact of historical circumstance and cultural expectation on the creative artist will be apparent. Students will respond through oral and written analysis to masterworks studied in class and to works experienced at outside performances. While all sections of the course will include historic masterworks from the fields of art, theater, dance, and music, specific content of individual sections will reflect the interests and expertise of the professor. Throughout the semester, we will examine a variety of artistic
    works and ideas to explore the role, meaning, and implications of questions that have shaped the human experience: Who and I? What can I know? How should I act?

    3.00 credits
    Fall, Spring
  
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    HONR 220 - Honors: Place As Text


    Prerequisites: HONR 100  
    Students explore designated towns, cities and/or regions locally, nationally, and/or globally through a combination of didactic and experiential learning methods. Students gain a deeper understanding of the history and contemporary culture of a region and its people through independent research and community engagement.

    1.00 - 3.00 credits
  
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    HONR 300 - Community Engagement Seminar


    Prerequisites: HONR 100   and HONR 103 ;

    may be used in fulfillment of the Honors CE requirement. This course combines didactic and experiential learning to create an advanced community engagement experience. 
    This course combines didactic and experiential learning to create an advanced community engagement experience. Directed service-learning experiences align with graded, academic assignments relating to the course themes to ensure effective and ethical community engagement. Classroom sessions further extend
    student learning through opportunities for critical reflection and discussion. This course may be repeated for credit.

    0.00-3.00 credits
    Fall, Spring

  
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    HONR 350 - Honors CPC Project


    Prerequisites: HONR 100   and HONR 103  

    may be used in fulfillment of the Honors CE requirement.  Students working on designated Honors projects through the RWU Community Partnership Center (CPC) may register for this course.
    With a faculty mentor, students extend their CPC experience through independent research and reflection to further integrate their service-learning and ethical community engagement experiences. Students participate in public dissemination of the community engagement project via both Honors and CPC forums.

    0.00-3.00 credits

  
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    HONR 375 - Independent Community Engagement Project


    Prerequisites: HONR 100  and HONR 103  

    may be used in fulfillment of the Honors CE requirement
    Students develop and execute an independent community engagement project. With the guidance of a faculty mentor, students develop a syllabus for extending their learning through a combination of didactics and fieldwork experiences. Students reflect on their learning and experiences to explore the social, cultural,
    and political forces that structure community issues and our response to them. Students disseminate the results of the community engagement experience to the broader Honors community.

    0.00-3.00 credits

  
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    HONR 400 - Honors Capstone Seminar


    Prerequisites: HONR 100 , at least junior standing 
    The student synthesizes learning experiences from the Core, the student’s major(s) and/or minor(s),and the Honors Program curriculum into an individualized learning reflection. Analysis and critical reflection on the student’s capstone project in relation to the Honors learning outcomes facilitates the completion of the Honors
    Capstone Reflection and prepares students for the Honors senior SASH symposium.

    1.00 credits
  
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    HONR 410 - Honors Independent Study


    Prerequisites: HONR 100 - Foundations of Honors; at least junior standing
    Note: May be used to fulfill the Honors Capstone Project requirement.

    May be used to earn credits towards the 18 Honors credit requirement.
    Delivery: Other
    Students work with a faculty mentor on a project or course of study addressing one or more of the Honors learning domains. Must be pre-approved by the Honors Program and the faculty mentor. This course may be repeated for credit. Yes

    1 credits
    Special Offerings

  
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    HONR 430 - Special Topics Seminar


    Prerequisites:  HONR 100  or consent of instructor 
    Advanced-level topics addressing one or more of the Honors learning domains (Scholarly Inquiry, Community Engagement, The Public Sphere) determined by the interest of students in consultation with faculty. This course may be repeated for credit, but students may study a single topic only once.

    1.0-3 credits credits
  
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    ME 351 - Critical Thinking and Problem Solving in Math Education


    Fulfills a requirement for the Mathematics Education Minor and the STEAM Education Minor.
    Delivery: Lecture
    The course engages participants in the process of inquiry while solving rich problems and tasks in the areas of logical reasoning, quantitative literacy, the history of mathematics, probability, number theory, problem-solving techniques, and applications of mathematics to the liberal arts curriculum. Emphasis is placed on the development of an understanding and lifelong appreciation for critical thinking and mathematical problem solving.

    The course may be taken for 1 or 3 credits.

     

    3 credits
    Fall and Spring

  
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    PA 352 - Non-Profit Management


    Cross-Listed with: CD.352
    Examination of current issues confronting health care managers. An assessment of current programs and management responses to emerging trends in the
    health care field, including delivery systems, marketing/competition, strategic planning, financial management and/or epidemiological changes. (3 credits)

  
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    PPSS 100 - Introduction to Public Safety


    Major Requirement
    Delivery: Other
    This course will provide students with an overview of the role and mission of corrections, policing, emergency medical services, and security in public safety. The course will examine the effects public policy, domestic and world events, and social issues have on the different components. Minimum Passing Grade: D- (per student handbook) Repeatable: Yes

    3 credits
    Fall and Spring
  
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    PPSS 110 - Introduction to Policing


    PPSS Major Requirement
    Delivery: Other
    This course will provide students with an understanding of the evolution of policing in the United States and the role of policing agencies in public safety. Specific topics will include different philosophies and deployment strategies of police resources, the effects of society’s standards and norms on the policing mission, and the future of policing. Minimum Passing Grade: D- (Per student handbook) Repeatable: Yes

    3 credits
    Fall and Spring
  
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    PPSS 120 - Introduction to Corrections


    PPSS
    Delivery: Other
    This course will provide students with an understanding of the evolution of corrections in the United States and the role of adult and juvenile correctional facilities, probation, parole, and diversion programs in public safety. Specific topics will include different philosophies related to deterrence, incapacitation, retribution, restitution, and rehabilitation, the effects of society’s standards and norms on corrections, and the future of corrections. Minimum Passing Grade: D- (Per student Handbook) Repeatable: Yes

    3 credits
    Fall and Spring
  
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    PPSS 130 - Introduction to Emergency Medical Services


    PPSS Major Requirement
    Delivery: Other
    This course will provide students with an understanding of the evolution of emergency medical services in the United States and the role of EMS in public safety. Specific topics will include different the effects of social and societal issues on the EMS mission, public health policy, and the future of emergency medical services. Minimum Passing Grade: D- (Per student handbook) Repeatable: Yes

    3 credits
    Fall and Spring
  
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    PPSS 140 - Introduction to Physical and Cyber Security


    PPSS Major Requirement
    Delivery: Other
    This course will provide students with an understanding of the role of private, public, and quasi-government agencies have in the public safety mission. Specific topics will include different physical and cyber security in a democratic society, the effects of emerging and evolving technology on public safety, and the future of physical and cyber security. Minimum Passing Grade: D- (Per student handbook) Repeatable: Yes

    3 credits
    Fall and Spring
  
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    PPSS 200 - Introduction to Public Safety Technology


    PPSS Major Requirement
    Delivery: Other
    This course will provide students an understanding of the use and deployment of technology in public safety. This will include the basic strengths and weaknesses of radio, telecommunications, and computer network structures, legal issues related to emerging technologies, like drones, body worn cameras and GPS tracking devices, public safety dispatch, records management, and mobile reporting systems, and Automated Electronic Defibrillator technology. Minimum Passing Grade: D- (Per student handbook) Repeatable: Yes

    3 credits
    Fall and Spring
  
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    PPSS 210 - Constitutional Law for Public Safety


    PPSS Major Requirement
    Delivery: Other
    This course will provide students with an understanding of the rights and liberties afforded by the U.S. Constitution and how these rights and liberties relate to the mission of public, private, and quasi-government agencies in providing public safety services, including privacy issues related to medical information, criminal activity, and technology Minimum Passing Grade: D- (per student handbook) Repeatable: Yes

    3 credits
    Fall and Spring
  
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    PPSS 220 - Criminal Procedure for Public Safety


    Policing, Public Safety, and Security
    Delivery: Other
    This course will provide students with an understanding of constitutional procedure related to criminal investigations and prosecutions. The focus of the course will be on the relevant case law and procedures related to searches and seizures, interrogations, confessions, eye-witness identifications, and the judicial process. Minimum Passing Grade: D- (per student handbook) Repeatable: Yes

    3 credits
    Fall and Spring
  
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    PPSS 230 - Threat Assessment for Public Safety


    Major Requirement UC PPSS
    Delivery: Other
    This course will provide students with an understanding of current theories and practices related to threat assessment and mitigation. Students will also learn the application of techniques and technologies in assessing vulnerabilities from both intentional acts and natural disasters. Minimum Passing Grade: D- (per student handbook) Repeatable: Yes

    3 credits
    Fall and Spring
  
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    PPSS 300 - Ethical Issues in Public Safety


    PPSS Major UC
    Delivery: Other
    In this course, students will identify current ethical issues in public safety along. Students will examine general ethical principles, along with those that are specific to public safety officials. An exploration of issues where there are conflicts of ethical obligations will also be conducted. Minimum Passing Grade: D- (per student handbook) Repeatable: Yes

    3 credits
    Fall and Spring
  
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    PPSS 450 - Public Safety Capstone


    UC PPSS Major requirement
    Delivery: Other
    This course synthesizes public safety concepts and perspectives covered in the core PPSS courses. Students will analyze real-world examples of the application of principles covered in these courses. Students will also explore current theoretical approaches and trends within the field of public safety. Minimum Passing Grade: D- (per student handbook) Repeatable: Yes

    3 credits
    Fall and Spring
  
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    PSYCH 200 - Introduction to Psychology


    Introduction to the basic conceptual approaches through which psychology derives its intellectual form. Emphasis is placed upon the nature of scientific inquiry and its role in obtaining an understanding of human behavior. Exposure to various psychological theories, including Fredianism, behaviorism, social learning, and humanism.

    3 credits
  
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    SFOP 501 - Education and Law


    This course fulfills requirements of the MS in School Finance and Operations.
    Delivery: Other
    The course explores law and its relationship to education, Constitutional law, legislative enactment, judicial law, school policies, and their relationships as they pertain to school administration.  Minimum Passing Grade: B-

    3 credits
    Fall and Spring
  
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    SFOP 502 - School Finance and Budgeting


    This course fulfills requirements of the MS in School Finance and Operations (proposed).
    Delivery: Other
    This course is designed to provide those who properly complete it with advanced knowledge of the issues and practices of school finance. The principal issues that are examined are why education is worthy of funding, who contributes to that funding, and in what proportions, and how the funding is raised in adequate amounts and equitably distributed. Current trends in school finance and what the future holds for education finance will also be examined.

    This course is designed to provide those who properly complete it with advanced knowledge of the issues and practices of school finance. The principal issues that are examined are why education is worthy of funding, who contributes to that funding, and in what proportions, and how the funding is raised in adequate amounts and equitably distributed. Current trends in school finance and what the future holds for education finance will also be examined.

    The practice of school finance, particularly at the local level will also be studied. Topics include school and district funding. Budgeting practices and philosophies, financial planning, and principles of accounting, auditing, financial reporting, cash management and debt management will be reviewed at some length. Application of these principles and practices will be personalized through the written assignments to the state in which the student lives or plans to practice. Minimum Passing Grade: B-

    3 credits
    Fall and Spring

  
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    SFOP 503 - School Facility, Property, and Ancillary Services Management


    This course fulfills requirements of the MS in School Finance and Operations (proposed).
    Delivery: Other
    Students will develop analytical and managerial capabilities necessary for making sound perational decisions related to facility management and other school operation ancillary functions. School Facility, Property, and Ancillary Services Management is designed for students to learn the principles and concepts of school facility planning; capital funding, maintenance, procurement processes, fixed asset management, transportation and food service  administration, and risk management.  Minimum Passing Grade: B-

    3 credits
    Fall and Spring
  
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    SFOP 504 - School Research and Data Analysis


    This course fulfills requirements of the MS in School Finance and Operations (proposed).
    Delivery: Other
    This course introduces students to quantitative and qualitative methods for conducting meaningful inquiry and research. Students will gain an overview of research intent and design, methodology and technique, format and presentation, and data management and analysis informed by commonly used statistical methods. The course will develop each student’s ability to use this knowledge to become more effective as school business officials.  Minimum Passing Grade: B-

    3 credits
    Fall and Spring
  
  •  

    SFOP 505 - Applied School Finance and Operations Practicum


    Prerequisites: To be eligible for Practicum credit a student must have:

    1. Been accepted into the MS School Finance and Operations Program

    2. Maintain 3.0 GPA or better

    3. Completed SFOP.501 (School Finance and Budgeting ), SFOP.502 (Education and Law) SFOP.503 (School Facility, Property, and Ancillary Services Management) and SFOP.504 (School Data Systems, Collections and Analysis)


    This course fulfills requirements of the MS in School Finance and Operations (proposed).
    Delivery: Other
    This course provides students with the opportunity to gain credit for practical, field, experience in school administration settings. Today’s school business executive must understand the business of the school finance and operations. Students will explore the various elements of the school business administration to include: budgeting, education law, school facility and ancillary services, and school data systems. Minimum Passing Grade: B-

    3 credits
    Fall and Spring

  
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    STEAM 321 - STEAM Engineering Explorations


    Fulfills a requirement for the STEAM Education Minor
    Delivery: Lec/Lab
    This course is to foster interest and engage students in STEAM success through real-life robotics. Robotics is all about STEM (science, technology, engineering, math) and a broad spectrum of the arts (visual arts, language arts, social studies, music, culture, and more). Students will use the Lego Mindstorms Robotics system, which includes the EV3 Programming Software, to learn basic and intermediate concepts of programming. Students will design and build programmable robots through an iterative process of engineering design to solve various problems in real-life situations (or simulations of these). These learning experiences will set the foundation for building the imagination and creativity that are fundamental to STEAM. For the culminating project, students will develop the ability to design engaging STEAM learning experiences and bring STEAM concepts alive by creating a fully developed action plan for launching a maker space program. A maker space is a creative prototyping workspace where makers gather to share knowledge, experiment, create, tinker and learn and can be situated in a variety of settings, such as classrooms, libraries, after-school programs and science museums. This course is open to all students.

    3 credits
    Fall
  
  •  

    STEAM 322 - Coding for STEAM


    Fulfills a requirement for the STEAM Education Minor.
    Delivery: Lecture
    This course examines the rationale for introducing coding experiences to children and adolescents and provides a foundation in programming skills and curriculum design for coding integration in a variety of settings including classrooms, camps, after-school programs and science centers. Emphasis is placed on conceptual understanding of the basics of computer coding and computational thinking, as well as the ability to design engaging learning experiences that will inspire and motivate interest in 21st century careers. This course is open to all students.

    3 credits
    Fall
  
  •  

    STEAM 324 - STEAM Field Experience


    It’s an elective course for STEAM Education Minor.
    Delivery: Lecture
    The purpose of this STEAM Field Experience course is two-fold: (1) for students to explore and work within a STEAM educational site congruent with their desired professional goals for 40 hours throughout the semester; and, (2) for students to attend weekly seminars designed to provide deep understanding of research-based best practices in STEAM education. This field experience and companion seminar are intended to be exploratory in nature, which provides experiential learning opportunities as well as reflection. Students learn ways to support STEAM learning through active, engaging, and fun approaches while engaging in best practices. This course is open to all students.

    3 credits
    Spring
  
  •  

    WEB 350 - Designing the User Experience


    Cross-Listed with: DSGN 350  Designing the User Experience
    Prerequisites: WEB 206   or Consent of Instructor
    Fullfills a 300 level requirement in the Web Development Major and Minor.
    Delivery: Studio
    User experience design aims to create products that people love to use. The focus in this course is in designing and implementing user tests and documenting the results. It introduces students to techniques and practices for incorporating feedback from user research and interviews into the design of interactive digital products using an iterative process that incorporates high- and low-fidelity prototypes. Students communicate design ideas through presentation, documentation and prototyping as appropriate.

    3 credits
    Fall

Accounting

  
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    ACCTG 201 - Accounting I: Financial


    Prerequisites: None
    A study of the fundamentals of accounting, with an emphasis on the use of economic data in the decision-making process. Topics covered include: forms of business organizations, financing options, and financial statement analysis. The ability to analyze financial statements is the overall goal of this course. Topics include inventory, property (plant and equipment/natural resources/ intangibles), liabilities, stockholder equity, investments, statement of cash flows.

    3 credits

    Fall, Spring

  
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    ACCTG 202 - Accounting II: Managerial


    Prerequisites: ACCTG 201 
    Continuation of ACCTG 201 (101), with an emphasis on the application of accounting principles to specific problem areas in managerial accounting as well as accounting for manufacturing operations, and cost-volume-profit analysis.

    3 credits
    Fall
  
  •  

    ACCTG 304 - Intermediate Accounting I


    Prerequisites: ACCTG 201 
    A deeper study of financial accounting principles, technical principles, and procedures of financial accounting. Topics include accounting principles and professional practice; information processing and the accounting cycle; revenue and expense recognition: income measurement and reporting; financial statements and additional disclosures; future and present values of cash flows; cash and shortterm investments; receivables; inventories; cost and flow assumptions; inventories; special valuation methods; plant assets; depreciation; intangible assets.

    3 credits
    Fall
  
  •  

    ACCTG 305 - Intermediate Accounting II


    Prerequisites: ACCTG 304  or consent of instructor
    Topics include long-term investments; long-term debt; contributed capital, retained earnings; dividends; current liabilities and contingencies, other elements of stockholder equity; treasury stock and EPS.

    3 credits
    Spring
  
  •  

    ACCTG 307 - Accounting Information Systems


    Prerequisites: ACCTG 202 , CIS 105  , CIS 102  
    Study and use of computerized general ledger, receivables, payables, payroll, and inventory systems. Topics include the examination of a variety of system design, implementation and control issues faced by contemporary business organizations.

    3 credits
    Fall
  
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    ACCTG 308 - Federal Income Tax I: Individual


    Prerequisites: ACCTG 202 
    Introduction to and survey of the Federal tax laws and the Federal revenue system as they apply to individual taxpayers. Topics include calculation of gross income, exclusions, deductions, credits, and computations.

    3 credits
    Fall
  
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    ACCTG 309 - Federal Income Tax II: Partnerships and Corporations


    Prerequisites: ACCTG 308 
    Applies concepts and skills of the first semester to the special problems involved in business tax returns. Topics include capital gains taxation, partnership, corporate, and specially taxed corporations. Introduction to “hands-on” tax research in the library. Students complete complex tax returns.

    3 credits
    Spring
  
  •  

    ACCTG 310 - Fraud Examination


    Prerequisites: ACCTG 202 
    This course introduces concepts and techniques useful for accountants, managers, business owners and criminal investigators. The course will cover the principles and methodology of fraud detection and deterrence. It covers many types of financial statement fraud including asset misappropriation, fraudulent financial statements, tax fraud and electronic fraud. Topics include skimming, cash larceny, check tampering, billing schemes, payroll and expense reimbursement schemes, and the detection, prevention, investigation and resolution of various types of fraud. Real cases and situations will be used to enhance the real world nature of the course.

    3 credits
    Summer
  
  •  

    ACCTG 325 - International Financial Reporting


    Prerequisites: ACCTG 202 
    Advanced Financial Reporting introduces and examines the international accounting standards as promulgated by the International Accounting Standards Board located in London. The SEC is scheduled to adopt the IFRS for U.S. companies and we will focus on the differences between current GAAP rules and the IFRS rules as applied to the recognition, measurement and reporting of assets, liabilities, revenue and expenses.

    3 credits
    Winter Intersession
  
  •  

    ACCTG 334 - Cost Accounting


    Prerequisites: ACCTG 202  or consent of instructor
    Emphasizes basic concepts involving cost accumulation, costs for planning and control, and cost-based decision analysis. Covers job order, process and standard costs, as well as an introduction to costvolume-profit analysis and relevant costs.

    3 credits
    Fall
  
  •  

    ACCTG 350 - International Accounting


    Prerequisites: ACCTG 202 
    A study of financial accounting for multinational companies reporting under International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS). The convergence of U.S. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) and IFRS serves as a foundation for this course. Topics include the effects of financial reporting, international taxation, and international financial statement analysis on a multinational reporting entity.

    3 credits
    Summer
  
  •  

    ACCTG 405 - Auditing


    Prerequisites: ACCTG 305 
    Examines auditing theory and real-world practice. Topics include generally accepted auditing standards, internal control, statistical sampling, as well as audit objectives, reporting and procedures.

    3 credits
    Spring
  
  •  

    ACCTG 406 - Advanced Accounting


    Prerequisites: ACCTG 305 
    Coverage of accounting for partnerships; introduction of the concepts of non-profit accounting, including governmental, schools, and other forms; fiduciary situations; business segments; installment sales; consignments; troubled debt restructuring; and corporate dissolutions.

    3 credits
    Fall
  
  •  

    ACCTG 410 - Accounting Independent Study


  
  •  

    ACCTG 411 - Ethics in Accounting and Auditing


    Prerequisites: ACCTG 201  and ACCTG 202 
    The course is a one-semester course. The course is a study of the impact of ethics on accounting and auditing. Topics covered include: ethical problems, codes of ethics, audit risk and materiality, international auditing standards, evidential matter, fraud considerations, auditor independence, a profession in crisis, whistle-blowing, ethics and politics, ethics and tax accounting, international ethical issues in accounting, gender differences in ethical perceptions, and the composition of boards.

    3 credits
    Fall, Alternate Years
  
  •  

    ACCTG 415 - Government & Non-Profit Accounting


    Prerequisites: ACCTG 305 
    Deeper consideration of the specialized rules and procedures used in governmental and other non-profit situations with the heaviest emphasis on the governmental area

    3 credits
    Spring Even years
  
  •  

    ACCTG 429 - Community Partnerships Center Accounting Studies


    Prerequisites: None
    This course involves a project selected by the Community Partnerships Center and the Business School Dean as an Accounting project. The students will work with a professor and possibly students from other disciplines to fulfill a task requested by a regional company, organization, or governmental unit. Specific project details vary and will be announced prior to preregistration for each semester

    3 credits
    All
  
  •  

    ACCTG 430 - Special Topics in Accounting


    Prerequisites: Consent of instructor
    Selected topics in areas chosen by students in consultation with their instructor. This experience is intended to provide an advanced level of course work or research in accounting.

    3 credits
    Special Offering
  
  •  

    ACCTG 469 - Accounting Coop


    Prerequisites: Senior standing in accounting and consent of instructor
    Designed to grant academic credit to students who work on a part-time basis in selected positions, usually without financial remuneration. Students may select from a wide variety of positions offered at local businesses, accounting firms, consulting firms, nonprofit organizations, and government agencies.

    By arrangement.
  
  •  

    ACCTG 505 - Financial and Managerial Accounting


    Prerequisites: None
    This course covers accounting concepts for MBA students, including preparing and analyzing the major financial statements for external reporting purposes, job-order costing, process costing, cost-volumeprofit analysis, budgeting and pro-forma financial statement development, flexible budgets, standard costing systems, cost allocation, responsibility accounting, and tools for short-term business decisions. The overall objective of the course is to develop students’ ability to analyze financial statements, understand accounting reports, and make economic decisions from relevant accounting information.

    Fall

American Studies

  
  •  

    AMST 100 - Approaches to the Study of American Society and Culture


    Prerequisites: None
    Fulfills a course requirement in the American Studies Core Concentration
    This course serves as an introduction to the field of American Studies by examining the ways that transnational borders, global interconnectedness, and intersections of identity affect people’s experiences in America. Using a variety of sources, such as popular culture, material culture, and the built environment, and viewing them through diverse lenses, such as race, class, gender, sexuality, and religion, students begin to learn and apply the skills of retrieval, evaluation, analysis and interpretation of written, visual, and aural evidence in the construction of well-argued narratives.

    3 credits
    Fall, Spring
  
  •  

    AMST 201 - American Studies Research Methods


    Prerequisites: AMST 100  or consent of instructor
    Fulfills a requirement in the American Studies major and minor
    This course trains students in the theory and practice of American Studies research methods. It focuses on collection, evaluation, analysis and synthesis of written, aural, and visual primary sources, and the application of interdisciplinary methodologies in creating and presenting topics of inquiry from diverse perspectives.

    3 credits
    Fall, Spring
  
  •  

    AMST 301 - Junior Community Colloquium


    Prerequisites: AMST 100 , AMST 201 , at least Junior standing or consent of the instructor
    Fulfills a requirement in the American Studies major.
    Students engaged in community based service projects will analyze their service within the context of a common group of readings that explore contemporary social issues in the United States and their relationship to community stewardship and grassroots organizing. Students will complete their service project and attend weekly colloquium meetings throughout the semester. Exact readings/topics addressed in the course may vary depending on the nature of the service projects that are undertaken.

    3 credits
    Fall, Spring
  
  •  

    AMST 370 - Topics in Race, Gender, and Sexuality in America


    Delivery: Lecture
    Fulfills a course requirement in the American Studies Major, Minor, and
    Core Concentration
     
    This variable topics course will explore the significance and impact
    of race, gender and/or sexuality in American life and culture, past
    and present. Each section of the course will focus on a specific topic
    and/or interpretation of these elements of the American experience,
    individually or in combination with each other. This is a variable
    content course and may be repeated for credit, but students may study
    a single topic only once.
    (3 credits) Fall, Spring


    Fall and Spring
  
  •  

    AMST 371 - Topics in Ethnicity, Class and Region in America


    Delivery: Lecture
    Fulfills a course requirement in the American Studies Major, Minor, and
    Core Concentration
     
    This variable topics course will explore the significance and impact
    of ethnicity, class and/or region in American life and culture, past
    and present. Each section of the course will focus on a specific topic
    and/or interpretation of these elements of the American experience,
    individually or in combination with each other. This is a variable
    content course and may be repeated for credit, but students may study
    a single topic only once.
    (3 credits) Fall, Spring


    Fall and Spring
  
  •  

    AMST 372 - Topics in American Material and Popular Culture


    Delivery: Lecture
    Fulfills a requirement in the American studies major, minor and core
    concentration
     
    This variable topics course will explore the significance and impact
    of material and/or popular culture in American life and culture, past
    and present. Each section of the course will focus on a specific topic
    and/or interpretation of these elements of the American experience,
    individually or in combination with each other. This is a variable
    content course and may be repeated for credit, but students may study
    a single topic only once.
    (3 credits) Fall, Spring


    Fall and Spring
  
  •  

    AMST 373 - Topics in American Ideas and Institutions


    Delivery: Lecture
    Fulfills a requirement for the major, minor, or core concentration
     
    This variable topics course will explore the significance and impact
    of various ideas and institutions; for example, transcendentalism,
    education, or religion, in American life and culture, past and
    present. Each section of the course will focus on a specific topic and/
    or interpretation of these elements of the American experience,
    individually or in combination with each other. This is a variable
    content course and may be repeated for credit, but students may study
    a single topic only once.
    (3 credits) Fall, Spring


    Fall and Spring
  
  •  

    AMST 420 - Senior Seminar I


    Prerequisites: AMST 100 , AMST 201 , and Senior standing or consent of the instructor
    Fulfills a requirement for the major, minor, or core concentration
    In this course, students will prepare to complete their program in American Studies through a) revisiting their coursework in the program, as well as any other coursework they choose to include, in order to synthesize the interdisciplinary connections across their undergraduate program, and b) read and analyze advanced common readings to provide further context and breadth of understanding of the field and their work in it. Students will demonstrate their mastery in both written and oral form.

    3 credits
    Fall
  
  •  

    AMST 421 - Senior Seminar II


    Prerequisites: Successful completion (C or higher) of AMST 420  
    Fulfills a requirement in the American Studies major.
    Students will complete an original research project on a topic of their choosing (in consultation with the instructor). Completion of this significant piece of scholarship will reflect the student’s mastery and understanding of American Studies as a field and will contribute new insight into the nature of American life and culture. Students will be required to present and defend their final project at a senior showcase.

    3 credits
    Spring
  
  •  

    AMST 430 - Topics in American Studies


    Prerequisites: None
    Forum for experimenting with new ideas, topics, and themes; topics or themes developed and studied by interested majors in conjunction with faculty.

    3 credits
    Special Offering

Anthropology

  
  •  

    ANSOC 100 - Introduction to Cultural Anthropology


    Prerequisites: None
    Fulfills a course requirement in the Anthropology + Sociology Core Concentration Fulfills a course requirement in the Graphic Design Core Concentration
    Cultural Anthropology examines the diversity of beliefs, values, structures and practices in the vast range of human social life in the contemporary world. This course introduces the principal concepts, methods and ethics that anthropologists employ to study culture and cross-cultural diversity by engaging ethnographic case studies, films and practical research exercises. Specific topics may include economic adaptation, political organization, kinship, gender, ethnicity, language, art religion and issues in applied anthropology.

    3 credits
    Fall, Spring
  
  •  

    ANSOC 200 - Sociocultural Reasoning & Practice


    Prerequisites: ANSOC 100  
    Fulfills a course requirement in the Anthropology + Sociology Core Concentration
    How do anthropologists investigate culture? What makes anthropology unique as a social science? The aim of this course is to provide an overview of perspectives and trends in cultural and social anthropology. Students will be introduced to some of the major theories that inspire and inform anthropological analysis and discover what makes anthropology distinctive among the social sciences. While the course is historical and chronological in organization, our central concern will be with how anthropologists have defined the field, the kinds of questions they have asked, and the methods used to attempt to answer those questions.

    3 credits
    Fall, Spring
  
  •  

    ANSOC 210 - Religious Diversity in Global Perspectives


    Prerequisites: None
    Fulfills a course requirement in the Anthropology + Sociology Core Concentration
    This course is a cross-cultural exploration of religious belief, myth, and ritual. The course emphasizes anthropological research and perspectives, but also draws on interdisciplinary sources. Specific topics include the origins and functions of religion in society, diverse interpretations of the supernatural, the symbolic meanings of myth and ritual, the roles of religious specialists, and religious experience. Assignments examine religious belief and practice within particular cultural contexts as well as in comparison to other cultures in the global context.

    3 credits
    Fall
  
  •  

    ANSOC 220 - Self, Culture and Society


    Prerequisites: ANSOC 100  
    Fulfills a course requirement in the Anthropology + Sociology Core Concentration
    Study of the role of culture in the formation of personality and the problems of individual adjustments to the demands of culture.

    3 credits
    Fall
  
  •  

    ANSOC 230 - Political Anthropology


    Prerequisites: ANSOC 100  
    Fulfills a course requirement in the Anthropology + Sociology Core Concentration
    An overview of questions of power and politics through an anthropological perspective, with special attention on inequality and violence in the non -Western world. Anthropologists have long been concerned with how different cultures organize themselves politically; in this course, we build from classical topics towards an investigation of how differences in power and political inequalities manifest themselves in the daily lives of people throughout the world. The course material blends a broad range of theoretical approaches to studying power with the close detail of ethnographic case studies.

    3 credits
    Spring
  
  •  

    ANSOC 240 - Ethnology


    Prerequisites: ANSOC 100  
    Fulfills a course requirement in the Anthropology + Sociology Core Concentration
    Ethnology is a study of human cultures from a comparative perspective. This course surveys global diversity by examining cultural differences and similarities in a variety of societies across the world. Through systematic cross-cultural comparisons of specific dimensions of society (e.g. family structure, gender roles) students will gain an understanding of the role culture plays in shaping human thought, behavior and social organization.

    3 credits
    Special Offering
  
  •  

    ANSOC 250 - Culture and the Environment


    Prerequisites: ANSOC 100  
    Fulfills a course requirement in the Anthropology + Sociology Core Concentration
    Explores the principles through which non-human environments shape human cultures and cultures in turn affect their environments. Students will become familiar with how a range of societies comes into relation with their environments both through their material transformations of ecosystems and the ideological and symbolic frameworks through which peoples envision human-nature interactions. Topics will include indigenous environmental knowledge, sustainable development, interspecies relations, environmental governance regimes, gender relations, and the global environmental movement.

    3 credits
    Alternate Fall
  
  •  

    ANSOC 260 - Native North Americans


    Prerequisites: ANSOC 100  
    Fulfills a course requirement in the Anthropology + Sociology Core Concentration
    A survey of native North American peoples. One group from each of the ten subculture areas is considered ethnographically. Topics may include Kwakiuti of the Northwest Coast, the Cheyenne of the Plains and the Iroquois of the Eastern Woodlands. The course introduces contemporary social problems related to the reservation system and urban migration.

    3 credits
    Fall, Spring
  
  •  

    ANSOC 270 - Global Health


    Cross-Listed with: PH 270  
    Prerequisites: ANSOC 100  
    Fulfills a course requirement in the Anthropology + Sociology Core Concentration Fulfills a course requirement in the Public Health minor
    The public health subfield of Global Health examines illnesses that affect human populations across national boundaries. This course introduces the subfield and emphasizes social science perspectives on the social, cultural, and political-economic forces that influence global health problems. Specific topics include longstanding health problems such as malaria and tuberculosis as well developing issues such as emerging infectious diseases and climate change.

    3 credits
    Spring
  
  •  

    ANSOC 280 - The Anthropology of Sport


    Prerequisites: None
    Fulfills a course requirement in the Anthropology + Sociology Core Concentration
    This course is an introduction to anthropology of sport. In the first third of the course students will learn about history of the anthropology of sport and see how each of five subfields of anthropology examines sport. During the rest of the course students will examine a variety of case studies through books and films, not only about North American sports and culture but also outside our borders, including Europe, South America and Asia.

    3 credits
    Fall
  
  •  

    ANSOC 299 - Special Topics in Anthropology + Sociology


    Prerequisites: ANSOC 100  
    Examines topics from the subfields of cultural anthropology. Initiated by student demand, interest of instructor, or timelines of offering.

    3 credits
    Special Offering
  
  •  

    ANSOC 300 - Qualitative Methods


    Prerequisites: ANSOC 200  (C- or higher ) or SOC 260 ; ( C- or higher)”. Open to Anthropology + Sociology Majors; junior standing or consent of instructor
    An overview of anthropological and sociological research methods. Provides an introduction to research design beginning with the concepts and principles of social research. Includes instruction in the development of research questions, sampling, measurement validity and reliability, hypothesis testing, and data collection and analysis with an emphasis on ethnographic techniques. Students will engage in fieldwork as part of the requirements for this class.

    3 credits
    Fall
  
  •  

    ANSOC 310 - Applied Anthropology


    Prerequisites: ANSOC 100  
    Fulfills a course requirement in the Anthropology + Sociology Core Concentration
    This course focuses on the advocacy and intervention components of anthropology. Students will enhance their assessment skills through an in-depth analysis of problems and solutions for particular cultures. Readings will address issues such as identifying local needs, promoting culturally appropriate responses to change, and protecting the rights of marginalized people.

    3 credits
    Alternate Spring
  
  •  

    ANSOC 320 - Reading Ethnographies


    Prerequisites: ANSOC 100  
    Fulfills a course requirement in the Anthropology + Sociology Core Concentration
    Ethnography has always been the distinctive characteristic of cultural and social anthropology. The focus of this class will be on reading ethnographies to learn about different types of ethnography, as well as explore the writing process for ethnography. It is a seminar style course which will raise questions concerning research, writing, data collection, ethics, the role of researcher, effects on the researched community and contributions to the professional field. The class will include relevant analytical experiences based on reading, research, and writing.

    3 credits
    Fall odd years
  
  •  

    ANSOC 330 - Cultures of Latin America


    Prerequisites: ANSOC 100  
    Fulfills a course requirement in the Anthropology + Sociology Core Concentration.
    This course introduces students to anthropological work on and ethnographic practice in Latin America. It covers a wide range of topics and aims to provide a solid background to the array of analytical perspectives anthropologists have drawn upon in their scholarly engagement with the region. Course includes a broad historical overview of the cultural and historical diversity of the region, as well as contemporary case studies of cultural transformations within specific countries.

    3 credits
    Alternate Spring
  
  •  

    ANSOC 340 - World Cultures


    Prerequisites: ANSOC 100  
    Fulfills a course requirement in the Anthropology + Sociology Core Concentration
    Survey of world cultures designed to develop understanding of the ways in which diverse people around the world view their own worlds. Focus will depend on faculty expertise and student interest.

    3 credits
    Alternate Spring
  
  •  

    ANSOC 350 - Medical Anthropology


    Prerequisites: ANSOC 100 ; recommended ANSOC 305  
    Fulfills a course requirement in the Anthropology + Sociology Core Concentration
    This course examines the ways that culture shapes the meaning of health and illness in everyday life by engaging the study of Medical Anthropology. This vast subfield of cultural anthropology encompasses the investigations of the cultural construction of health and illness, mind-body interaction, the social relations of healing, and the political-economy of health care, among other more specific topics. The course material merges theoretical and applied approaches to explore research of both Western biomedical and non-western medical traditions as they shape diagnosis, treatment and the experience of suffering. Assignments incorporate instruction in the qualitative methods used in this subfield of cultural anthropology.

    3 credits
    Alternate Years
  
  •  

    ANSOC 360 - Culture Change and Development


    Prerequisites: ANSOC 100  
    Fulfills a course requirement in the Anthropology + Sociology Core Concentration
    Focuses on change that is inherent in all cultures. This course will examine how anthropologists have explained the ways cultures change, by theorizing, for example, processes of evolution, diffusion, and domination, and addressing the long-term positive and negative implications.

    3 credits
    Alternate Fall
  
  •  

    ANSOC 400 - Senior Seminar


    Cross-Listed with: SOC 460  
    Prerequisites: ANSOC 300  (C- or higher)
    This course is designed to foster a deeper understanding of anthropology and sociology. Students will be required to produce research suitable for presentation at a student-research conference and/or publication in either anthropology or sociology student-level research journals. Topics will be determined by the expertise of the instructor and student interest.

    3 credits
    Spring
  
  •  

    ANSOC 430 - Special Topics


    Prerequisites: ANSOC 100  
    Fulfills a course requirement in the Anthropology + Sociology Core Concentration
    Study of special topics in anthropology. Topics determined by student needs and the availability of appropriate instruction.

    3 credits
    Special Offering
  
  •  

    ANTH 104 - Intro to Cultural Anthropology



Aquaculture and Aquarium Science

  
  •  

    AQS 262 - Aquarium System Design and Life Support and Lab


    Prerequisites: None
    Fulfills a Marine Biology elective in the Applied category
    There is a strong and broad-based need from many education, research and commercial organizations for information on the planning, design, construction and operation of seawater systems. Unfortunately, an understanding of biology or engineering alone is not likely to result in a practical, working system design. Biologists generally do not understand the mechanical and hydraulic aspects of design, while engineers do not typically appreciated the biological considerations. This course is intended to provide the technical knowledge and practical experience that will enable students to design successful systems on a variety of scales. Lecture portion will focus on design issues, while laboratory will concentrate on water quality and toxicity as part of the need to provide life support to seawater systems.

    4 credits
    Spring
  
  •  

    AQS 264 - Principles of Aquatic Animal Husbandry and Lab


    Prerequisites: None
    A survey of captive fish and invertebrates and the conservation issues surrounding their use. Care and maintenance focusing on the compatibility, propagation potential, captive breeding, culture challenges and advancements in technology will be examined. Course will cover important aspects of species acquisition, collection and transfer, as well as special husbandry needs of selected organisms. The laboratory will focus on the techniques and skills associated with successfully maintaining aquatic animals in captivity.

    4 credits
    Fall
 

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