Aug 17, 2022  
2018-2019 University Catalog 
    
2018-2019 University Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses


 

Other Courses

  
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    COOP 460 - COOP Cooperative Education


    Internship

    3 credits
    Fall, Spring, Summer, Winter
  
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    COOP 469 - Internship


    3 credits
  
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    HONR 100 - Foundations of Honors


    This First-Year Experience course introduces students to the meaning and methods of Honors Community Engagement, and the Honors Learning Domains. Students begin to define their role as citizen-scholars through the exploration and interrogation of local communities. Independent research, critical reflection, and experiential learning via the Honors City as Text pedagogy complement the Honors LLC and Core Curriculum and orient students to the praxis of the Honors student-scholar.

    1.00 credits
    Fall
  
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    HONR 101 - Honors:Scientific Investigations


    Fullfils CORE.101 requirement 
    This interdisciplinary course explores important issues of societal and personal relevance by evaluating testable ideas through experimentation
    and literature-based research in lecture and laboratory settings. Students will use the process of science to generate data and
    synthesize new ideas to come to evidence-based conclusions that will illuminate responses to the three core questions: Who am I, What can I know, and given what I know, how should I act? Lecture content will vary across sections to reflect the expertise of instructors from the breadth of scientific disciplines including astronomy,
    biology, chemistry, environmental science, geology, oceanography, physics, public health, and sustainability studies, among others. The laboratory experience complements the lecture by providing students with hands-on opportunities to use the scientific method as they lead their own research investigations.

    4.00 credits
    Spring
  
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    HONR 102 - Honors:Challenges of Democracy


    Fullfils CORE.102 requirement
    This course, which is taught primarily by faculty from the Departments of History & American Studies and Politics & International Relations, investigates the roots of current democratic thought through the study of primary source material dating from antiquity to the present. Other sources of inquiry may include scholarly analyses, films and documentaries, and works of the imagination including literature and art. Upon completion of the course, students will be able to explain, evaluate and critique the key concepts from these primary source readings and demonstrate how these concepts are expressed in the modern world. Special attention will be paid to the student’s ability to apply this knowledge to such topics as political institutions,activism and national identity.

    3.00 credits
    Fall, Spring
  
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    HONR 103 - Honors:Human Behavior Perspective


    Fulfills CORE.103 requirement
    A study of the individual in society, this course draws from disciplines such as psychology, sociology, and anthropology in order to demonstrate the idea that multiple perspectives and frames of reference broaden our understanding of specific behaviors. A focus on cultural diversity will be a central feature throughout the course. The course also proposes a model for critical thinking about human behavior in general. Students explore the limitations of a single point of view and the benefits of information derived from multiple vantages as they consider key existential questions: Who am I? What can I know? And, based upon what I know, how should I act? 

    3.00 credits
    Fall, Spring
  
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    HONR 104 - Honors:Literature and Philosophy of Examined Life


    Fulfills CORE.104 requirement
    This course explores central questions related to the examined life-Who am I? What can I know? How should I act?-through literary and philosophical texts. Participants practice close reading and logical reasoning as methods for understanding how literary and philosophical texts convey meaning. Common readings include selected
    dialogues by Plato.

    3.00 credits
    Fall, Spring
  
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    HONR 105 - Honors:Aesthetics in Context Art Impulse


    The course fulfills the university’s CORE 105 requirement.
    This course examines a variety of masterworks and
    artists from the western traditions of art,
    dance, music, and theater. The course situates
    art in historical perspective, emphasizes
    Classicism, Romanticism, Modernism, and relates
    them to contemporary modes of expression. Works
    of art will be presented in context, so the
    impact of historical circumstance and cultural
    expectation on the creative artist will be
    apparent. Students will respond through oral and
    written analysis to masterworks studied in class
    and to works experienced at outside performances.
    While all sections of the course will include
    historic masterworks from the fields of art,
    theater, dance, and music, specific content of
    individual sections will reflect the interests
    and expertise of the professor. Throughout the
    semester, we will examine a variety of artistic
    works and ideas to explore the role, meaning, and
    implications of questions that have shaped the
    human experience: Who and I? What can I know? How
    should I act?

    3.00 credits
    Fall, Spring
  
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    HONR 105 - Honors:Aesthetics in Context Art Impulse


    Fulfills CORE.105 requirement
    This course examines a variety of masterworks and artists from the western traditions of art, dance, music, and theater. The course situates art in historical perspective, emphasizes Classicism, Romanticism, Modernism, and relates them to contemporary modes of expression. Works of art will be presented in context, so the impact of historical circumstance and cultural expectation on the creative artist will be apparent. Students will respond through oral and written analysis to masterworks studied in class and to works experienced at outside performances. While all sections of the course will include historic masterworks from the fields of art, theater, dance, and music, specific content of individual sections will reflect the interests and expertise of the professor. Throughout the semester, we will examine a variety of artistic
    works and ideas to explore the role, meaning, and implications of questions that have shaped the human experience: Who and I? What can I know? How should I act?

    3.00 credits
    Fall, Spring
  
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    HONR 220 - Honors: Place As Text


    Prerequisites: HONR 100  
    Students explore designated towns, cities and/or regions locally, nationally, and/or globally through a combination of didactic and experiential learning methods. Students gain a deeper understanding of the history and contemporary culture of a region and its people through independent research and community engagement.

    1.00 - 3.00 credits
  
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    HONR 300 - Community Engagement Seminar


    Prerequisites: HONR 100   and HONR 103 ;

    may be used in fulfillment of the Honors CE requirement. This course combines didactic and experiential learning to create an advanced community engagement experience. 
    This course combines didactic and experiential learning to create an advanced community engagement experience. Directed service-learning experiences align with graded, academic assignments relating to the course themes to ensure effective and ethical community engagement. Classroom sessions further extend
    student learning through opportunities for critical reflection and discussion. This course may be repeated for credit.

    0.00-3.00 credits
    Fall, Spring

  
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    HONR 350 - Honors CPC Project


    Prerequisites: HONR 100   and HONR 103  

    may be used in fulfillment of the Honors CE requirement.  Students working on designated Honors projects through the RWU Community Partnership Center (CPC) may register for this course.
    With a faculty mentor, students extend their CPC experience through independent research and reflection to further integrate their service-learning and ethical community engagement experiences. Students participate in public dissemination of the community engagement project via both Honors and CPC forums.

    0.00-3.00 credits

  
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    HONR 375 - Independent Community Engagement Project


    Prerequisites: HONR 100  and HONR 103  

    may be used in fulfillment of the Honors CE requirement
    Students develop and execute an independent community engagement project. With the guidance of a faculty mentor, students develop a syllabus for extending their learning through a combination of didactics and fieldwork experiences. Students reflect on their learning and experiences to explore the social, cultural,
    and political forces that structure community issues and our response to them. Students disseminate the results of the community engagement experience to the broader Honors community.

    0.00-3.00 credits

  
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    HONR 400 - Honors Capstone Seminar


    Prerequisites: HONR 100 , at least junior standing 
    The student synthesizes learning experiences from the Core, the student’s major(s) and/or minor(s),and the Honors Program curriculum into an individualized learning reflection. Analysis and critical reflection on the student’s capstone project in relation to the Honors learning outcomes facilitates the completion of the Honors
    Capstone Reflection and prepares students for the Honors senior SASH symposium.

    1.00 credits
  
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    HONR 430 - Special Topics Seminar


    Prerequisites:  HONR 100  or consent of instructor 
    Advanced-level topics addressing one or more of the Honors learning domains (Scholarly Inquiry, Community Engagement, The Public Sphere) determined by the interest of students in consultation with faculty. This course may be repeated for credit, but students may study a single topic only once.

    1.0-3 credits credits

Accounting

  
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    ACCTG 201 - Accounting I: Financial


    Prerequisites: None
    A study of the fundamentals of accounting, with an emphasis on the use of economic data in the decision-making process. Topics covered include: forms of business organizations, financing options, and financial statement analysis. The ability to analyze financial statements is the overall goal of this course. Topics include inventory, property (plant and equipment/natural resources/ intangibles), liabilities, stockholder equity, investments, statement of cash flows.

    3 credits

    Fall, Spring

  
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    ACCTG 202 - Accounting II: Managerial


    Prerequisites: ACCTG 201 
    Continuation of ACCTG 201 (101), with an emphasis on the application of accounting principles to specific problem areas in managerial accounting as well as accounting for manufacturing operations, and cost-volume-profit analysis.

    3 credits
    Fall
  
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    ACCTG 209 - Financial Management for the Arts


    Prerequisites: None
    Fulfills a requirement in the Arts Management Minor for students on the arts track
    Note: This course will not substitute for any of the Accounting courses required by business students
    This is a one-semester course intended for non-business students minoring in Arts Management. This course is a study of the fundamentals of accounting and finance with an emphasis on the use and presentation of economic data in the decision making process in arts organizations. Topics covered include: cash and internal controls, receivables, property, liabilities, investments, cash flows and cash flow budgets, cost-volume-profit and break-even point analysis, capital budgets, financing options and financial statements for both profit and not-for-profit arts organizations.

    4 credits
    Spring, odd years
  
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    ACCTG 304 - Intermediate Accounting I


    Prerequisites: ACCTG 201 
    A deeper study of financial accounting principles, technical principles, and procedures of financial accounting. Topics include accounting principles and professional practice; information processing and the accounting cycle; revenue and expense recognition: income measurement and reporting; financial statements and additional disclosures; future and present values of cash flows; cash and shortterm investments; receivables; inventories; cost and flow assumptions; inventories; special valuation methods; plant assets; depreciation; intangible assets.

    3 credits
    Fall
  
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    ACCTG 305 - Intermediate Accounting II


    Prerequisites: ACCTG 304  or consent of instructor
    Topics include long-term investments; long-term debt; contributed capital, retained earnings; dividends; current liabilities and contingencies, other elements of stockholder equity; treasury stock and EPS.

    3 credits
    Spring
  
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    ACCTG 307 - Accounting Information Systems


    Prerequisites: ACCTG 202 , CIS 101, CIS 102 
    Study and use of computerized general ledger, receivables, payables, payroll, and inventory systems. Topics include the examination of a variety of system design, implementation and control issues faced by contemporary business organizations.

    3 credits
    Fall
  
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    ACCTG 308 - Federal Income Tax I: Individual


    Prerequisites: ACCTG 202 
    Introduction to and survey of the Federal tax laws and the Federal revenue system as they apply to individual taxpayers. Topics include calculation of gross income, exclusions, deductions, credits, and computations.

    3 credits
    Fall
  
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    ACCTG 309 - Federal Income Tax II: Partnerships and Corporations


    Prerequisites: ACCTG 308 
    Applies concepts and skills of the first semester to the special problems involved in business tax returns. Topics include capital gains taxation, partnership, corporate, and specially taxed corporations. Introduction to “hands-on” tax research in the library. Students complete complex tax returns.

    3 credits
    Spring
  
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    ACCTG 310 - Fraud Examination


    Prerequisites: ACCTG 202 
    This course introduces concepts and techniques useful for accountants, managers, business owners and criminal investigators. The course will cover the principles and methodology of fraud detection and deterrence. It covers many types of financial statement fraud including asset misappropriation, fraudulent financial statements, tax fraud and electronic fraud. Topics include skimming, cash larceny, check tampering, billing schemes, payroll and expense reimbursement schemes, and the detection, prevention, investigation and resolution of various types of fraud. Real cases and situations will be used to enhance the real world nature of the course.

    3 credits
    Summer
  
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    ACCTG 325 - International Financial Reporting


    Prerequisites: ACCTG 202 
    Advanced Financial Reporting introduces and examines the international accounting standards as promulgated by the International Accounting Standards Board located in London. The SEC is scheduled to adopt the IFRS for U.S. companies and we will focus on the differences between current GAAP rules and the IFRS rules as applied to the recognition, measurement and reporting of assets, liabilities, revenue and expenses.

    3 credits
    Winter Intersession
  
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    ACCTG 334 - Cost Accounting


    Prerequisites: ACCTG 202  or consent of instructor
    Emphasizes basic concepts involving cost accumulation, costs for planning and control, and cost-based decision analysis. Covers job order, process and standard costs, as well as an introduction to costvolume-profit analysis and relevant costs.

    3 credits
    Fall
  
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    ACCTG 350 - International Accounting


    Prerequisites: ACCTG 202 
    A study of financial accounting for multinational companies reporting under International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS). The convergence of U.S. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) and IFRS serves as a foundation for this course. Topics include the effects of financial reporting, international taxation, and international financial statement analysis on a multinational reporting entity.

    3 credits
    Summer
  
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    ACCTG 405 - Auditing


    Prerequisites: ACCTG 305 
    Examines auditing theory and real-world practice. Topics include generally accepted auditing standards, internal control, statistical sampling, as well as audit objectives, reporting and procedures.

    3 credits
    Spring
  
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    ACCTG 406 - Advanced Accounting


    Prerequisites: ACCTG 305 
    Coverage of accounting for partnerships; introduction of the concepts of non-profit accounting, including governmental, schools, and other forms; fiduciary situations; business segments; installment sales; consignments; troubled debt restructuring; and corporate dissolutions.

    3 credits
    Fall
  
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    ACCTG 410 - Accounting Independent Study


  
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    ACCTG 411 - Ethics in Accounting and Auditing


    Prerequisites: ACCTG 201  and ACCTG 202 
    The course is a one-semester course. The course is a study of the impact of ethics on accounting and auditing. Topics covered include: ethical problems, codes of ethics, audit risk and materiality, international auditing standards, evidential matter, fraud considerations, auditor independence, a profession in crisis, whistle-blowing, ethics and politics, ethics and tax accounting, international ethical issues in accounting, gender differences in ethical perceptions, and the composition of boards.

    3 credits
    Fall, Alternate Years
  
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    ACCTG 415 - Government & Non-Profit Accounting


    Prerequisites: ACCTG 305 
    Deeper consideration of the specialized rules and procedures used in governmental and other non-profit situations with the heaviest emphasis on the governmental area

    3 credits
    Spring Even years
  
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    ACCTG 429 - Community Partnerships Center Accounting Studies


    Prerequisites: None
    This course involves a project selected by the Community Partnerships Center and the Business School Dean as an Accounting project. The students will work with a professor and possibly students from other disciplines to fulfill a task requested by a regional company, organization, or governmental unit. Specific project details vary and will be announced prior to preregistration for each semester

    3 credits
    All
  
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    ACCTG 430 - Special Topics in Accounting


    Prerequisites: Consent of instructor
    Selected topics in areas chosen by students in consultation with their instructor. This experience is intended to provide an advanced level of course work or research in accounting.

    3 credits
    Special Offering
  
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    ACCTG 469 - Accounting Coop


    Prerequisites: Senior standing in accounting and consent of instructor
    Designed to grant academic credit to students who work on a part-time basis in selected positions, usually without financial remuneration. Students may select from a wide variety of positions offered at local businesses, accounting firms, consulting firms, nonprofit organizations, and government agencies.

    By arrangement.
  
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    ACCTG 505 - Financial and Managerial Accounting


    Prerequisites: None
    This course covers accounting concepts for MBA students, including preparing and analyzing the major financial statements for external reporting purposes, job-order costing, process costing, cost-volumeprofit analysis, budgeting and pro-forma financial statement development, flexible budgets, standard costing systems, cost allocation, responsibility accounting, and tools for short-term business decisions. The overall objective of the course is to develop students’ ability to analyze financial statements, understand accounting reports, and make economic decisions from relevant accounting information.

    Fall

American Studies

  
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    AMST 100 - Approaches to the Study of American Society and Culture


    Prerequisites: None
    Fulfills a course requirement in the American Studies Core Concentration
    This course serves as an introduction to the field of American Studies by examining the ways that transnational borders, global interconnectedness, and intersections of identity affect people’s experiences in America. Using a variety of sources, such as popular culture, material culture, and the built environment, and viewing them through diverse lenses, such as race, class, gender, sexuality, and religion, students begin to learn and apply the skills of retrieval, evaluation, analysis and interpretation of written, visual, and aural evidence in the construction of well-argued narratives.

    3 credits
    Fall, Spring
  
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    AMST 201 - American Studies Research Methods


    Prerequisites: AMST 100  or consent of instructor
    Fulfills a requirement in the American Studies major and minor
    This course trains students in the theory and practice of American Studies research methods. It focuses on collection, evaluation, analysis and synthesis of written, aural, and visual primary sources, and the application of interdisciplinary methodologies in creating and presenting topics of inquiry from diverse perspectives.

    3 credits
    Fall, Spring
  
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    AMST 301 - Junior Community Colloquium


    Prerequisites: AMST 100 , AMST 201 , at least Junior standing or consent of the instructor
    Fulfills a requirement in the American Studies major.
    Students engaged in community based service projects will analyze their service within the context of a common group of readings that explore contemporary social issues in the United States and their relationship to community stewardship and grassroots organizing. Students will complete their service project and attend weekly colloquium meetings throughout the semester. Exact readings/topics addressed in the course may vary depending on the nature of the service projects that are undertaken.

    3 credits
    Fall, Spring
  
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    AMST 370 - Topics in Race, Gender, and Sexuality in America


    Prerequisites: None
    Pre- or Co-requisite: AMST 100  
    Fulfills a course requirement in the American Studies Major, Minor, and Core Concentration
    This variable topics course will explore the significance and impact of race, gender and/or sexuality in American life and culture, past and present. Each section of the course will focus on a specific topic and/or interpretation of these elements of the American experience, individually or in combination with each other. This is a variable content course and may be repeated for credit, but students may study a single topic only once.

    3 credits
    Fall, Spring
  
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    AMST 371 - Topics in Ethnicity, Class and Region in America


    Prerequisites: None
    Pre- or Co-requisite: AMST 100  
    Fulfills a course requirement in the American Studies Major, Minor, and Core Concentration
    This variable topics course will explore the significance and impact of ethnicity, class and/or region in American life and culture, past and present. Each section of the course will focus on a specific topic and/or interpretation of these elements of the American experience, individually or in combination with each other. This is a variable content course and may be repeated for credit, but students may study a single topic only once.

    3 credits
    Fall, Spring
  
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    AMST 372 - Topics in American Material and Popular Culture


    Prerequisites: None
    Pre- or Co-requisite: AMST 100  or consent of instructor
    Fulfills a requirement in the American studies major, minor and core concentration
    This variable topics course will explore the significance and impact of material and/or popular culture in American life and culture, past and present. Each section of the course will focus on a specific topic and/or interpretation of these elements of the American experience, individually or in combination with each other. This is a variable content course and may be repeated for credit, but students may study a single topic only once.

    3 credits
    Fall, Spring
  
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    AMST 373 - Topics in American Ideas and Institutions


    Prerequisites: None
    Pre- or Co-requisite: AMST 100  
    Fulfills a requirement for the major, minor, or core concentration
    This variable topics course will explore the significance and impact of various ideas and institutions; for example, transcendentalism, education, or religion, in American life and culture, past and present. Each section of the course will focus on a specific topic and/ or interpretation of these elements of the American experience, individually or in combination with each other. This is a variable content course and may be repeated for credit, but students may study a single topic only once.

    3 credits
    Fall, Spring
  
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    AMST 420 - Senior Seminar I


    Prerequisites: AMST 100 , AMST 201 , and Senior standing or consent of the instructor
    Fulfills a requirement for the major, minor, or core concentration
    In this course, students will prepare to complete their program in American Studies through a) revisiting their coursework in the program, as well as any other coursework they choose to include, in order to synthesize the interdisciplinary connections across their undergraduate program, and b) read and analyze advanced common readings to provide further context and breadth of understanding of the field and their work in it. Students will demonstrate their mastery in both written and oral form.

    3 credits
    Fall
  
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    AMST 421 - Senior Seminar II


    Prerequisites: Successful completion (C or higher) of AMST 420  
    Fulfills a requirement in the American Studies major.
    Students will complete an original research project on a topic of their choosing (in consultation with the instructor). Completion of this significant piece of scholarship will reflect the student’s mastery and understanding of American Studies as a field and will contribute new insight into the nature of American life and culture. Students will be required to present and defend their final project at a senior showcase.

    3 credits
    Spring
  
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    AMST 430 - Topics in American Studies


    Prerequisites: None
    Forum for experimenting with new ideas, topics, and themes; topics or themes developed and studied by interested majors in conjunction with faculty.

    3 credits
    Special Offering

Anthropology

  
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    ANTH 100 - Introduction to Cultural Anthropology


    Prerequisites: None
    Fulfills a course requirement in the Anthropology + Sociology Core Concentration Fulfills a course requirement in the Graphic Design Core Concentration
    Cultural Anthropology examines the diversity of beliefs, values, structures and practices in the vast range of human social life in the contemporary world. This course introduces the principal concepts, methods and ethics that anthropologists employ to study culture and cross-cultural diversity by engaging ethnographic case studies, films and practical research exercises. Specific topics may include economic adaptation, political organization, kinship, gender, ethnicity, language, art religion and issues in applied anthropology.

    3 credits
    Fall, Spring
  
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    ANTH 104 - Intro to Cultural Anthropology


  
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    ANTH 200 - Native North Americans


    Prerequisites: ANTH 100  
    Fulfills a course requirement in the Anthropology + Sociology Core Concentration
    A survey of native North American peoples. One group from each of the ten subculture areas is considered ethnographically. Topics may include Kwakiuti of the Northwest Coast, the Cheyenne of the Plains and the Iroquois of the Eastern Woodlands. The course introduces contemporary social problems related to the reservation system and urban migration.

    3 credits
    Fall, Spring
  
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    ANTH 205 - Religious Diversity in Global Perspectives


    Prerequisites: None
    Fulfills a course requirement in the Anthropology + Sociology Core Concentration
    This course is a cross-cultural exploration of religious belief, myth, and ritual. The course emphasizes anthropological research and perspectives, but also draws on interdisciplinary sources. Specific topics include the origins and functions of religion in society, diverse interpretations of the supernatural, the symbolic meanings of myth and ritual, the roles of religious specialists, and religious experience. Assignments examine religious belief and practice within particular cultural contexts as well as in comparison to other cultures in the global context.

    3 credits
    Fall
  
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    ANTH 212 - Studies in Anthropology


    Prerequisites: ANTH 100  
    Fulfills a course requirement in the Anthropology + Sociology Core Concentration
    Field methods: offered in conjunction with pre-approved study abroad programs. Emphasizes methodologies for collecting data.

    3 credits
    Special Offering
  
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    ANTH 220 - Self, Culture and Society


    Prerequisites: ANTH 100  
    Fulfills a course requirement in the Anthropology + Sociology Core Concentration
    Study of the role of culture in the formation of personality and the problems of individual adjustments to the demands of culture.

    3 credits
    Fall
  
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    ANTH 222 - Environmental Anthropology


    Prerequisites: ANTH 100  
    Fulfills a course requirement in the Anthropology + Sociology Core Concentration
    Explores the principles through which non-human environments shape human cultures and cultures in turn affect their environments. Students will become familiar with how a range of societies comes into relation with their environments both through their material transformations of ecosystems and the ideological and symbolic frameworks through which peoples envision human-nature interactions. Topics will include indigenous environmental knowledge, sustainable development, interspecies relations, environmental governance regimes, gender relations, and the global environmental movement.

    3 credits
    Alternate Fall
  
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    ANTH 230 - Political Anthropology


    Prerequisites: ANTH 100  
    Fulfills a course requirement in the Anthropology + Sociology Core Concentration
    An overview of questions of power and politics through an anthropological perspective, with special attention on inequality and violence in the non -Western world. Anthropologists have long been concerned with how different cultures organize themselves politically; in this course, we build from classical topics towards an investigation of how differences in power and political inequalities manifest themselves in the daily lives of people throughout the world. The course material blends a broad range of theoretical approaches to studying power with the close detail of ethnographic case studies.

    3 credits
    Spring
  
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    ANTH 240 - Ethnology


    Prerequisites: ANTH 100  
    Fulfills a course requirement in the Anthropology + Sociology Core Concentration
    Ethnology is a study of human cultures from a comparative perspective. This course surveys global diversity by examining cultural differences and similarities in a variety of societies across the world. Through systematic cross-cultural comparisons of specific dimensions of society (e.g. family structure, gender roles) students will gain an understanding of the role culture plays in shaping human thought, behavior and social organization.

    3 credits
    Special Offering
  
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    ANTH 244 - The Anthropology of Sport


    Prerequisites: None
    Fulfills a course requirement in the Anthropology + Sociology Core Concentration
    This course is an introduction to anthropology of sport. In the first third of the course students will learn about history of the anthropology of sport and see how each of five subfields of anthropology examines sport. During the rest of the course students will examine a variety of case studies through books and films, not only about North American sports and culture but also outside our borders, including Europe, South America and Asia.

    3 credits
    Fall
  
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    ANTH 260 - The Anthropological Lens


    Prerequisites: ANTH 100  
    Fulfills a course requirement in the Anthropology + Sociology Core Concentration
    How do anthropologists investigate culture? What makes anthropology unique as a social science? The aim of this course is to provide an overview of perspectives and trends in cultural and social anthropology. Students will be introduced to some of the major theories that inspire and inform anthropological analysis and discover what makes anthropology distinctive among the social sciences. While the course is historical and chronological in organization, our central concern will be with how anthropologists have defined the field, the kinds of questions they have asked, and the methods used to attempt to answer those questions.

    3 credits
    Fall, Spring
  
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    ANTH 270 - Global Health


    Cross-Listed with: PH 270  
    Prerequisites: ANTH 100  
    Fulfills a course requirement in the Anthropology + Sociology Core Concentration Fulfills a course requirement in the Public Health minor
    The public health subfield of Global Health examines illnesses that affect human populations across national boundaries. This course introduces the subfield and emphasizes social science perspectives on the social, cultural, and political-economic forces that influence global health problems. Specific topics include longstanding health problems such as malaria and tuberculosis as well developing issues such as emerging infectious diseases and climate change.

    3 credits
    Spring
  
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    ANTH 299 - Special Topics in Anthropology


    Prerequisites: ANTH 100 
    Examines topics from the subfields of cultural anthropology. Initiated by student demand, interest of instructor, or timelines of offering.

    3 credits
    Special Offering
  
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    ANTH 300 - Reading Ethnographies


    Prerequisites: ANTH 100  
    Fulfills a course requirement in the Anthropology + Sociology Core Concentration
    Ethnography has always been the distinctive characteristic of cultural and social anthropology. The focus of this class will be on reading ethnographies to learn about different types of ethnography, as well as explore the writing process for ethnography. It is a seminar style course which will raise questions concerning research, writing, data collection, ethics, the role of researcher, effects on the researched community and contributions to the professional field. The class will include relevant analytical experiences based on reading, research, and writing.

    3 credits
    Fall odd years
  
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    ANTH 310 - Applied Anthropology


    Prerequisites: ANTH 100  
    Fulfills a course requirement in the Anthropology + Sociology Core Concentration
    This course focuses on the advocacy and intervention components of anthropology. Students will enhance their assessment skills through an in-depth analysis of problems and solutions for particular cultures. Readings will address issues such as identifying local needs, promoting culturally appropriate responses to change, and protecting the rights of marginalized people.

    3 credits
    Alternate Spring
  
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    ANTH 351 - Cultures of Latin America


    Prerequisites: ANTH 100  
    Fulfills a course requirement in the Anthropology + Sociology Core Concentration.
    This course introduces students to anthropological work on and ethnographic practice in Latin America. It covers a wide range of topics and aims to provide a solid background to the array of analytical perspectives anthropologists have drawn upon in their scholarly engagement with the region. Course includes a broad historical overview of the cultural and historical diversity of the region, as well as contemporary case studies of cultural transformations within specific countries.

    3 credits
    Alternate Spring
  
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    ANTH 356 - World Cultures


    Prerequisites: ANTH 100  
    Fulfills a course requirement in the Anthropology + Sociology Core Concentration
    Survey of world cultures designed to develop understanding of the ways in which diverse people around the world view their own worlds. Focus will depend on faculty expertise and student interest.

    3 credits
    Alternate Spring
  
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    ANTH 370 - Medical Anthropology


    Prerequisites: ANTH 100 ; recommended SOC 300  
    Fulfills a course requirement in the Anthropology + Sociology Core Concentration
    This course examines the ways that culture shapes the meaning of health and illness in everyday life by engaging the study of Medical Anthropology. This vast subfield of cultural anthropology encompasses the investigations of the cultural construction of health and illness, mind-body interaction, the social relations of healing, and the political-economy of health care, among other more specific topics. The course material merges theoretical and applied approaches to explore research of both Western biomedical and non-western medical traditions as they shape diagnosis, treatment and the experience of suffering. Assignments incorporate instruction in the qualitative methods used in this subfield of cultural anthropology.

    3 credits
    Alternate Years
  
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    ANTH 380 - Culture Change and Development


    Prerequisites: ANTH 100  
    Fulfills a course requirement in the Anthropology + Sociology Core Concentration
    Focuses on change that is inherent in all cultures. This course will examine how anthropologists have explained the ways cultures change, by theorizing, for example, processes of evolution, diffusion, and domination, and addressing the long-term positive and negative implications.

    3 credits
    Alternate Fall
  
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    ANTH 410 - Anthropology Independent Study


  
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    ANTH 430 - Special Topics


    Prerequisites: ANTH 100  
    Fulfills a course requirement in the Anthropology + Sociology Core Concentration
    Study of special topics in anthropology. Topics determined by student needs and the availability of appropriate instruction.

    3 credits
    Special Offering
  
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    ANTH 454 - Qualitative Methods


    Prerequisites: ANTH 260  (C- or higher ) or SOC 260 ; ( C- or higher)”. Open to Anthropology + Sociology Majors; junior standing or consent of instructor
    An overview of anthropological and sociological research methods. Provides an introduction to research design beginning with the concepts and principles of social research. Includes instruction in the development of research questions, sampling, measurement validity and reliability, hypothesis testing, and data collection and analysis with an emphasis on ethnographic techniques. Students will engage in fieldwork as part of the requirements for this class.

    3 credits
    Fall
  
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    ANTH 460 - Anthropology Senior Seminar


  
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    ANTH 460 - Senior Seminar


    Cross-Listed with: SOC 460 
    Prerequisites: ANTH 454  (C- or higher)
    This course is designed to foster a deeper understanding of anthropology and sociology. Students will be required to produce research suitable for presentation at a student-research conference and/or publication in either anthropology or sociology student-level research journals. Topics will be determined by the expertise of the instructor and student interest.

    3 credits
    Spring

Aquaculture and Aquarium Science

  
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    AQS 262 - Aquarium System Design and Life Support and Lab


    Prerequisites: None
    Fulfills a Marine Biology elective in the Applied category
    There is a strong and broad-based need from many education, research and commercial organizations for information on the planning, design, construction and operation of seawater systems. Unfortunately, an understanding of biology or engineering alone is not likely to result in a practical, working system design. Biologists generally do not understand the mechanical and hydraulic aspects of design, while engineers do not typically appreciated the biological considerations. This course is intended to provide the technical knowledge and practical experience that will enable students to design successful systems on a variety of scales. Lecture portion will focus on design issues, while laboratory will concentrate on water quality and toxicity as part of the need to provide life support to seawater systems.

    4 credits
    Spring
  
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    AQS 264 - Principles of Aquatic Animal Husbandry and Lab


    Prerequisites: None
    A survey of captive fish and invertebrates and the conservation issues surrounding their use. Care and maintenance focusing on the compatibility, propagation potential, captive breeding, culture challenges and advancements in technology will be examined. Course will cover important aspects of species acquisition, collection and transfer, as well as special husbandry needs of selected organisms. The laboratory will focus on the techniques and skills associated with successfully maintaining aquatic animals in captivity.

    4 credits
    Fall
  
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    AQS 306 - Principles of Museum Exhibit Development


    Prerequisites: None
    This course will introduce students to the basic aspects of successful exhibit design and methods for conveying educational information to the general public in an aquarium or museum setting. The course will include an introduction to commonly used materials and techniques; the incorporation of good graphic design; and the distillation of educational concepts into interesting and informative materials. This course will be led by the design team at the New England Aquarium, and will involve the creation of exhibits for actual use in a public setting. It is anticipated that the communication and design skills acquired in this course will be applicable to a wide variety of not-for-profit environmental and educational organizations.

    3 credits
    Alternate Fall
  
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    AQS 314 - Field Collection Methods (Bahamas)


    Prerequisites: None
    Fulfills a Marine Biology elective in the Applied category
    This three credit course is organized as a ten day off-campus program offered through the New England Aquarium. Each Spring, the Aquarium organizes a field identification and collecting trip to Cay Sal bank in the Bahamas. For this course, the trip will be timed to coincide with the RWU Spring Break, and one of the RWU Faulty will accompany the students. Up to 15 students can sign up to work alongside Aquarium professionals as the collect and identify reef fish and invertebrates. The trip includes accommodations and up to 5 dives/day abroad the R/V Coral Reef II, meals and beverages, and a dive in the Aquarium’s Giant Ocean Tank. Students will increase their fish identification skills, learn about conservation efforts in the Bahamas, and participate in on-going reef conservation studies.

    3 credits
    Spring
  
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    AQS 318 - Aquatic Animal Health and Lab


    Cross-Listed with: BIO 318 
    Prerequisites: AQS 262  and AQS 264 ; or consent of instructor
    The course addresses important diseases and disease prevention methods in aquatic animals from an aquaculture/fisheries and ornamental perspective. Subjects covered include elected anatomical and physiological systems and water/environmental systems important to understanding, preventing and treating diseases of various bivalve molluscs, lobsters/crabs, cephalopods, echinoderms and fish. Lectures will include aspects of biosecurity and water quality that affect disease occurrence and the spread of infectious agents. Current aquaculture/fisheries issues will be discussed. The laboratory portion of the course will provide experience in the methods used in handling, anesthesia, euthanasia, treatment, use of diagnostic tests, prevention of disease spread and maintaining healthy cultured and display animals.

    4 credits
    Fall
  
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    AQS 346 - Principles of Hatchery Management and Lab


    Prerequisites: None
    Fulfills a Marine Biology elective in the Applied category
    The aquaculture industry relies on hatcheries production facilities that nurture young aquatic organisms to the point where their survival is assured. Hatcheries include facilities dedicated to the production of almost any fresh or saltwater aquatic species including: shellfish, tropical marine fish, trout, abalone, and seaweed. This course is intended to support an education in aquaculture and give students practical experience in the operation of all aspects of hatchery. The content of this course will depend on the instructor, but will focus on either shellfish or marine ornamental production as these are the two main production facilities that currently operated at the university. This course will be very hands-on and include important aspects of animal husbandry and production.

    4 credits
    Alternate Fall
  
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    AQS 352 - Public Aquarium Management


    Prerequisites: None
    This course will instruct students in all aspects of the management of a large public aquarium facility. This includes how to maintain a healthy life support system for display organisms as well as an overview of the management of staff, interns and volunteers, financial considerations, corporate structure, regulatory requirements, permitting, marketing and all aspects of operating a large not-for-profit organization. This will be accomplished through examination of the operations and management structure of the New England Aquarium and will rely on tours of the facility and a series of seminars offered by the key departmental heads at the facility. It is anticipated that the skills acquired in this course can be applicable to a wide variety of not-for-profit environmental and educational organizations.

    3 credits
    Special Offering
  
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    AQS 410 - Aquaculture and Aquarium Science Independent Study


  
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    AQS 420 - New England Aquarium Internship


    Prerequisites: Junior-level in good standing; Overall GPA of 2.8 of higher; Acceptance to the NEAq internship program
    Registration for this course is limited to students who have been accepted for a semester long internship at the New England Aquarium (NEAq) in Boston, Ma. Internships at NEAq offer college students experience in areas ranging from veterinary services and animal husbandry to communications and program development. Each Internship will include: 1) an active research component that requires 15-20 hours per week in a laboratory setting under the direction of a research scientist at the New England Aquarium (NEAq) and 2) an animal husbandry experience of 15-20 hours per week at the NEAq with responsibilities that will familiarize students with the daily operation and maintenance required in running a large public aquarium. The duties of this experience may include feeding animals, cleaning tanks and equipment, and providing treatment for diseased animals.

    8 credits
    Fall, Spring, Summer
  
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    AQS 430 - Topics in Aquarium Science and/or Lab


    Prerequisites: Consent of Instructor
    Advanced-level topics of importance in aquarium science.

    1-4 credits
    Special Offering
  
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    AQS 450 - Research in Aquaculture/ Aquarium Science


    Prerequisites: Consent of instructor
    Original independent research in aquaculture and/or aquarium science. Research projects are chosen in consultation with a faculty research advisor. May be repeated for credit

    1-3 credits
    Offered on demand
  
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    AQS 451 - Aquaculture/Aquarium Science Senior Thesis


    Prerequisites: Prior departmental approval of a research proposal. 3.3 GPA or permission of the department, and AQS 450 
    This course serves as a capstone experience for outstanding students majoring in aquarium science and aquaculture. Working closely with a faculty mentor, students engage in original research on a topic of their choice. The research may involve laboratory experiments, field work, or computer simulations. This course provides experience in designing and conducting experiments, critically analyzing data, reviewing published scientific literature and communicating scientific information. The culmination of the course is a formal written thesis and a public oral presentation.

    3 credits
    Fall, Spring

Architecture

  
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    ARCH 100 - Exploring Architecture


    Prerequisites: None
    Note: Enrollment limited to high school students who have completed their junior year and high school students who have completed their sophomore year with permission at the time of application
    A four week introduction to architectural issues, concepts, and basic design methodology for high school students interested in understanding architecture as a possible area of college study and career. Course instruction is via workshops and individualized studio critique emphasizing freehand drawing, design exercises, field trips, lectures and portfolios. The grade is based on overall performance with special emphasis on the quality of a major project.

    3 credits
    Summer
  
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    ARCH 101 - Foundations of Architecture


    Prerequisites: None
    A classroom-based introduction to the nature of the architectural endeavor, and the means used to make architecture. Lectures and explorations of issues of public and private space, architectural composition, and the multiple responsibilities architects face in society in relation to a diversity of users and clients, the site, and the public realm will form the basis for classroom discussion, and written and graphic assignments.

    3 credits
    Fall
  
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    ARCH 113 - Architectural Design Core Studio I


    Prerequisites: None
    A rigorous introduction to the fundamentals of architecture and design utilizing iterative exercises grouped around nine design topics developed and presented in two and three-dimensional media. Repetition reinforces the mastering freehand drawing, drafting and model making skills. Lectures introduce formal principles underlying each project group: geometric composition, scale and proportion, architectural elements, space definition, analytical diagramming, color, and solar orientation to study light and shadow. The emphasis is on abstract design but the course ends with the design of a scaled and inhabited space. Minimum passing grade average of “C” required in ARCH 113-ARCH 114 .

    5 credits
    Fall, Spring
  
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    ARCH 114 - Architectural Design Core Studio II


    Prerequisites: ARCH 113  
    This course continues the first semester’s focus on elemental design principles and visual communication, but initiates a departure from the abstract realm of design into the tangible world of built architectural form. The projects and their supporting lectures examine the language of architecture through exercises exploring fundamental architectural design principles: spatial organizations, circulation and movement, simple structural and enclosure systems, spatial articulation, site response and solar orientation. To ensure clarity and understanding, all building programs are simple but evocative, and project sites vary from rural to urban and from flat to sloped. Minimum passing grade average of “C” required in ARCH 113 -114.

    5 credits
    Spring, Summer
  
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    ARCH 213 - Architectural Design Core Studio III


    Prerequisites: ARCH 114 
    Core Studio III concentrates on the exploration of a rational design methodology through the process of analysis, synthesis and transformation. Through a series of short exercises and comprehensive projects, students are encouraged to develop a conceptual basis for their work, with an emphasis on site, climate and the environment, along with the principles of organization, including spatial hierarchy, circulation and structure, as determinants of architectural form. Students will quickly generate multiple viable solutions for each project and will present their work in a variety of formats from quick conceptual sketches and models to carefully crafted drawings. There will be a concentration on the design of space in section and an ongoing study of the quality of light. Students explore the potential of the sites they visit through in-depth inquiries and are introduced to design in an urban context. There is an emphasis on three-dimensional visual communication skills and the start of the integration of computer drawings into the studio. A series of theme based faculty lectures will augment the studio work. Students are required to present a digital portfolio at the middle and end of the semester. Minimum passing grade of “C” is required.

    5 credits
    Fall
  
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    ARCH 214 - Architectural Design Core Studio IV


    Prerequisites: ARCH 213 , MATH 136  or higher
    This studio continues to develop the students’ design process and explores the concepts and strategies that have the capacity to significantly determine building form. Particular emphasis will be placed on the relationship of design to program, structure and materials through the study of dwellings. Special attention will be paid to an understanding of human scale and its impact upon design. Short sequential exercises enable students to develop an understanding of the use of different materials and their structural implications. Bearing wall, columnar (including free-plan) and modular building systems will be studied. These shorter problems will be followed by a longer assignment that uses different urban sites in a variety of locations as the catalyst for an investigation into how the fundamental human need for shelter is affected by regional and cultural precedents and particular climatic conditions. Students are asked to address basic environmental issues by considering passive strategies for heating and cooling. The development of graphic, computer and three-dimensional communication skills development are also continued. Faculty lectures will be integrated into the semester and a digital portfolio will be required. Minimum passing grade of “C” required.

    5 credits
    Spring
  
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    ARCH 231 - Construction Materials and Assemblies I


    Prerequisites: Sophomore standing
    This course is an introductory overview to the “art of making buildings.” The student shall survey materials and methods used in building construction for foundation, wall, floor, roof, enclosure & interior finish systems and their employment in the design process for traditional, nontraditional and sustainable building environments with emphasis on architectural expression. The major physical systems found in buildings and design constraints that influence them will be examined in the context of wood and masonry construction. The course also dedicates a substantial portion of its time to the examination of building envelope concepts as the locus of design resolution between technical and architectural realms. The course engages ARCH 214 - Architectural Design Core Studio IV  as a means to integrate materials and assemblies in students’ design thinking.

    3 credits
    Fall, Spring
  
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    ARCH 287 - Introduction to Computer Applications in Design


    Prerequisites: Sophomore Standing
    An introduction to computer systems - software and hardware, and their application in architecture. Emphasis is placed on learning how the computers can assist in the design process by modeling, visualizing and analyzing building designs. Introduction to drafting and three-dimensional modeling.

    3 credits
    Fall
  
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    ARCH 313 - Architectural Design Core Studio V


    Prerequisites: ARCH 214  
    The focus of this studio is upon the integration of building form, structure as space-generator, construction materials & assemblies and sustainability themes in architectural design. The studio also engages the continued refinement of four broad areas of architectural design education: (1) development of a theory base; (2) development of design methods and studio skills; (3) urban issues; and (4) development of a fuller appreciation for the understanding of construction technology and its function as a medium for architectural design. Minimum passing grade of “C” required.

    5 credits
    Fall, Summer
  
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    ARCH 321 - Site and Environment


    Prerequisites: Sophomore standing
    This course presents an overview inventory of all the factors/systems that may be encountered in any analysis of site conditions. The student will be presented with a general description of how each factor operates and procedures to maintain or improve the quality of the site environment. This course promotes a value system based upon the preservation of both natural and cultural ecology. Value and meaning flow from a concept of sustainability at all levels of cultural and environmental interaction.

    3 credits
    Fall
  
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    ARCH 322 - Theory of Architecture


    Prerequisites: AAH 121 -AAH 122 , ARCH 325 
    The intention of this course is to familiarize students with a variety of historical, theoretical and methodological issues that have structured contemporary understanding and criticism of architecture. The class introduces students to the polemics and debates of the post-war period, the developments and influence of non-Western modern architecture, post-modernism, the theoretical investigations centered around structuralism and post-structuralism, the development of the various schools of architectural theory in the 1970s and 1980s, and contemporary theoretical and critical positions.

    3 credits
    Fall, Spring, Summer
  
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    ARCH 324 - Evolution of Urban Form


    Cross-Listed with: ARCH 524 
    Prerequisites: AAH 121  AAH 122  or URBN 100 
    Examines and analyzes the evolution of urban form, from neolithic villages to cities of the emerging modern era. Addresses why cities have taken the forms they have, and their formal, physical, and spatial elements. Students consider urban structure and dynamics relative to architectural expression, building types, and urban open spaces.

    3 credits
    Annually
  
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    ARCH 325 - History of Modern Architecture


    Prerequisites: AAH 121 -AAH 122  or URBN 100  or permission of instructor
    This course on modern architecture examines buildings, cities, and landscapes in relation to the visual arts, culture, politics, and technological and social change. It begins with the origins of modern architecture in Western Europe, and continues with an exploration of key 19th-century architects and theorists. It highlights the 20th-century avant-gardes and concludes with the crystallization of modern architecture in the West and around the world. The course seeks to explain the modern not only as a visual phenomenon, but also as an intellectual, philosophical, and cultural idea.

    3 credits
    Fall, Spring
  
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    ARCH 327 - History of American Architecture


    Prerequisites: AAH 121 -AAH 122  or permission of instructor
    Examines American Architecture and architectural thought from 1800 to the 1960s. The course is organized around a series of key themes. Special emphasis will be placed upon architecture as a force within, and a manifestation of American culture at large.

    3 credits
    Fall
  
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    ARCH 329 - History of Landscape Architecture


    Co-listed with: ARCH 529 
    Prerequisites: AAH 121 -AAH 122  or permission of instructor
    History of Landscape Architecture is a survey of the development of man’s relationship to and shaping of the land. This course will survey the landscape and gardens from the beginnings of civilization until contemporary times, although the primary emphasis will be on the Italian Renaissance, the gardens of France in the age of Louis XIV, and the English garden. The course will also include contributing cultures, such as China, India and Japan, as well as study the growth of parks in the 19th century, particularly in the United States.

    3 credits
    Spring
  
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    ARCH 331 - Construction Materials and Assemblies II


    Prerequisites: ARCH 231  
    This continuation of Construction Materials and Assemblies I provides students with the awareness and understanding necessary for the selection of materials, components and assemblies for the design and construction of buildings. The course explores traditional and non-traditional building techniques, methods and materials selection with particular emphasis on steel, concrete, and glass in relation to fabrication and assembly methods, historical influences, function, sustainability, and architectural expression. Issues of materials’ embodied energy as well as recyclability and disassembly are also considered. The course also dedicates a substantial portion of its time to the examination of building envelope concepts as the locus of design resolution between technical and architectural design realms. Detailing issue includes optimization of the building’s thermal performance. The course engages with ARCH 313 - Architectural Design Core Studio V  as a means to integrate materials and assemblies issues in the student’s design thinking.

    3 credits
    Fall
  
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    ARCH 332 - Acoustics and Lighting


    Prerequisites: Junior standing
    This course addresses three of the many form generators in architecture, the acoustical, day lighting and artificial lighting environment. It also addresses the soft and hard technologies that support the creation of these environments using “rules of thumb”, analytical calculations and modeling. The course provides an introduction and conceptual understanding of these subjects. Sustainability is embedded in the nature of the subjects with a particular emphasis on energy conservation, integration of natural and artificial systems; the effect on contemporary practice, and the emerging roles of architectural careers and consultants in these disciplines.

    The course is subdivided into three equal offerings: acoustical principles and practical applications in buildings that affects site selection and evaluation of buildings and their orientation on a site and shaping of space for sound control, all done in conjunction with case studies. The second and third parts deal with natural or day lighting and artificial lighting with an emphasis on their integration through design. Basic principles are introduced, design procedures outlined, calculating methods reviewed, case studies and the use of physical and computer modeling investigated. The students will gain a sufficient basic understanding of acoustical, day lighting and artificial lighting design in order to feel confident in making these concerns an inherent part of their design process.

    3 credits
    Spring

  
  •  

    ARCH 333 - Building Systems: Equipment for Buildings


    Prerequisites: Junior standing
    This course provides a basic study of the mechanical, sanitary, water supply, sewage disposal, heating, ventilating, air conditioning, fire protection and electrical equipment and systems used in buildings. The student learns the basics of active and passive heating, cooling and ventilating systems, load calculations, life safety ventilation, psychometrics, plumbing, storm drainage, fire protection systems, and electrical, energy codes and management with discussion of energy conservation and construction budgeting as well as M & E construction documents.

    Particular emphasis is given to systems integration. First is the recognition that buildings consist of seven component systems; space planning, structural, mechanical, electrical, plumbing (including fire protection); enclosure, and fitments (fixtures and furniture). Second is the need to consider these systems as early in the design process as possible. Design considerations such as points of origin, generating equipment, distribution devices, delivery mechanisms, control systems and energy usage are studied. Sustainability is embedded in the nature of these subjects with a particular emphasis on energy conservation and efficient design practices. Where possible “rules of thumb” sizing and diagramming techniques are examined and technical design development are explored from the point of view of, energy efficiency, the architect’s design and the engineering consultant’s criteria. Classroom lectures, case studies (on hard and soft technologies) and a field trip are used to expand on the reading assignments and to provide a general introduction and overview of the subject.

    3 credits
    Fall

 

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